Archive for the ‘Nadia Conners’ Category

Director’s Interviews

August 16, 2007

Leila and Nadia have two great interviews just released:Nadia’s is with Truthout:

We do talk about existing technologies as both transitional solutions and long-term solutions, but technology is nothing without an evolution in culture. We need to regain our citizenship – we have been turned into full-time consumers, and as a result, the infrastructure of our physical and mental society is in collapse. How are we going to demand that the administration – this one or the next – build green or develop better transportation systems or retool the wasteful processes of the industrial production system if we don’t engage as humans on a political level? The technologies exist right now that can dramatically reduce our impact on the planet – but they are not being implemented at the scale needed to make the difference we desperately need right now. We need a societal movement on the level of the civil rights movement to take back the power we have lost, so that we can begin to push for changes that serve the greater good of people and the planet, and not just the corporate few.

Leila’s is at World Changing:

The film creates and awareness about the real nature of the problem, that it’s human thinking and behavior that is at the root of the destruction. And it is human behavior and thinking that will change it. From that we hope will flow a whole host of solutions and actions that people can take on their own, through the action community or other non-profits that they support. We show a lot of solutions in the film; most primarily that we need to move to renewable energy and redesign most of what we make, change the internal logic.

Advertisements

11th Hour as a Tool

August 13, 2007

When Nadia, Leo, and I made “The 11th Hour,” we hoped it would give attention to people, issues, and ideas that the mainstream media had ignored for decades. We hoped, the people in the film could use it to advance the causes so many of them have courageously and stubbornly championed for decades.

It’s why I’m so happy in the last few days with how Tzeporah Berman has used the film to bring attention to the destruction of Canada’s forest. People don’t realize that Canada’s ancient forests are important life systems not just for Canada, but for the planet, and we’re cutting them down for junk mail.

So take a look here at the initial press release Tzeporah put out. The paper industry issued a reply the following day, and Forest Ethics has recevied a lot of press attention, here’s an example and some other highlights:

“Logging in Canada alone contributes as much greenhouse-gas emissions every year as all the cars in California,” she said.

Intact forests are carbon storehouses. When logged they release carbon emissions into the air as they degrade, she said.

B.C. forests, where some of the world’s largest and tallest trees grow, hold more carbon per hectare than any other ecosystem on earth, said Berman, a leading figure in the 1993 Clayoquot Sound protests and co-founder of ForestEthics, an environmental group focused on forest protection.”

Reposted from www.11thhouraction.com

from Leila Conners Peterson

11th Hour Review – Grist

August 13, 2007

The environmental webzine Grist has a good review of the 11th Hour. 

If this film gains popular exposure and acceptance, the impetuous to change our society will never be stronger. I’ve been in the streets on this fundamental issue for many years, this may be the thing that brings the soccer moms and senior citizens out there with the us 20-somethings too.

Speaking with Nadia, she philosophized that real change may not happen until this is seen as a human rights movement. Comparing this movement with the civil rights movement, and the amount of social unrest and cohesion which propelled that through the laggard politicians of the day.

This movie is transideological, caring about the quality of life for the future of humanity should never be wrapped up transient and petty politics, religion, or business. When sustainability is not built into these institutions, they do not exist for long on this earth.

Well, perhaps your reading of this review shows someone a little over-enthused on the subject. I contend that watching this movie will give you exactly this empowered sense. As Bill McDonough says we get to imagine what it means to “re-design design itself.” This is really the context of the movie, the path that humanity must walk if our culture is to survive.

 Reposted from www.11thhouraction.com/blog

from Joe Costello

Leonardo on The 11th Hour and the Environment

August 9, 2007

Here’s a good one on one video clip of Leonardo talking about the film, how he became aware of environmental problems, and how we can meet the challenges we face:

http://video.accesshollywood.com/player/?id=141051

Also AP video has nice piece with Leonardo and then with Leila and Nadia. Leila asks people to come to 11thhouraction.com, check it out:

http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/player/popup/?rn=49750&cl=3632843&ch=68276&src=news

And from last night’s Los Angeles Premiere

Reposted from www.11thhouraction.com/blog

from Joe Costello